August 17, 2017

FBI chief sacking: ‘Four to be interviewed’ to replace Comey

46The first interviews to find a replacement for fired FBI Director James Comey take place on Saturday.
Acting FBI Director Andrew McCabe is among four people who will meet with Attorney General Jeff Sessions and his deputy Rod Rosenstein.
But about 11 people in all are being considered, US media report.
President Trump has faced a backlash for sacking Mr Comey, who had been investigating alleged Russian meddling in the US election.
White House spokesman Sean Spicer told reporters the president would fill the job “as soon as he finds a candidate that fits the qualities that he feels are necessary”.
Fox News quoted a government source as saying they were moving “quickly and expeditiously” to find a replacement, adding: “We’re doing our due diligence – we are not going to cut any corners.”

One of those being interviewed is Republican Senator John Cornyn, the second highest-ranking member of the Senate and a former Texas Attorney General.
Andrew McCabe was the FBI’s deputy director until the abrupt departure of his boss. He appeared to contradict the White House this week when he described the inquiry into alleged Russian meddling in the US election as “a highly significant investigation”.
He also cast doubt on White House claims that Mr Comey had lost the confidence of his staff.
The other two candidates named in the US press are New York Appeals Court Judge Michael Garcia and senior lawyer Alice Fisher.
Mr Garcia is a former New York prosecutor and Ms Fisher was an assistant attorney general for the Justice Department’s criminal division. She currently works at a law firm.
Meanwhile, President Trump is facing growing questions about whether he secretly recorded his conversations with Mr Comey.
In a tweet, Mr Trump appeared to issue a thinly veiled threat to Mr Comey, saying he had “better hope there are no tapes” of their conversations.
The BBC’s Laura Bicker in Washington says Mr Trump was referring to a private White House dinner in January during which the president claims Mr Comey assured him he was not being investigated over alleged links to Russia.
Mr Trump seemed to be suggesting that he would release recordings if Mr Comey gave his own version of events, she adds.
In a tweet, Mr Trump appeared to issue a thinly veiled threat to Mr Comey, saying he had “better hope there are no tapes” of their conversations.
The BBC’s Laura Bicker in Washington says Mr Trump was referring to a private White House dinner in January during which the president claims Mr Comey assured him he was not being investigated over alleged links to Russia.
Mr Trump seemed to be suggesting that he would release recordings if Mr Comey gave his own version of events, she adds.

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